On Writing, Random Thoughts

Q&A With A Wordsmith: A Day In The Life

Heya Lovelies,

As a writer taking a rather unique path, I often receive a wide range of questions. So far, I’ve covered some broad topics which you can find here and I’ll continue to shed some light on further questions. With luck, you’ll gain some understanding and insight along the way.

If you have a question you’d like me to answer, feel free to comment or drop me an email.


Question:
How many hours a day do you write? What does a typical day of writing look like to you?

Answer:

Let me start off by saying that I don’t have a day job. But that doesn’t mean my days are simple and easy. 

If I’m feeling well enough, I’ll write or edit from mid- to late- morning until lunchtime, take break for more coffee and then restart my pre-writing routine for another hour or two in the afternoon. 

With the pre-writing ritual I mentioned last week, I start up my playlist to settle my racing mind, and brew a hot beverage (usually coffee). By the time I sit in my favorite seat — a vintage, red velvet wing chair with a dark walnut frame, my mind and muse are ready to begin. 

While I’m writing, I know the progression of the story, so I don’t often run into instances where I just don’t know what to write. However, my muse may be on hiatus for a day here and there to show my progress. Otherwise, I’m usually able to churn out around three scenes over the course of the day, which generally equates to about one thousand words each.

There are plenty of days where I either don’t feel well enough (like a bad headache) to do more than one scene, or do anything other than stay in bed (in this case, a migraine). Self-doubt and debilitating anxiety often rears its head if this happens, but I do my best to accept that my circumstances won’t allow me to accomplish as much as I’d hoped. 

Because brain fog and eye strain are real to me, I try to keep myself balanced within my limitations and look out for signs that I’m over-exerting myself. Otherwise, I’ll end out regretting it the following day. 

Here’s a basic rundown
of my schedule on a good day:

10 AM to 12 PM – Writing or editing
12 PM to 1 PM – break for lunch
1 PM to 3 PM – Writing or editing

Being able to write as I do is a privilege that I don’t squander. If you have 12 hours to spare or only ten minutes a day, it doesn’t matter. The main thing is that you show up to do it. And don’t berate yourself if you’re not making the most out of each minute. 


Coming up, I’ll dive into the age-old question: does the plot come first, or is it the characters?

Until next time,
Sarah

P. S. If you want to see for yourself what books I have to offer, find your FREE copies at your favorite retailer

P. P. S. If you are interested in learning more about me, my books, and other various, important topics on a monthly basis, along with access to a free, ever-growing resource library of downloadable content, sign up for my newsletter.

On Writing, Random Thoughts

Q&A With A Wordsmith: On The Artistic Process

Heya Lovelies,

As a writer taking a rather unique path, I often receive a wide range of questions. So far, I’ve covered some broad topics which you can find here and I’ll continue to shed some light on further questions. With luck, you’ll gain some understanding and insight along the way.

If you have a question you’d like me to answer, feel free to comment or drop me an email.


Question:
What is your artistic process? Does anything impede that?

Answer:

My artistic process varies depending on what I set out to do. But mostly, it’s a delicate balance between ritual, creativity, and technical skill. 

First and foremost, however, I start with a ritual. Always beginning with coffee or another hot drink of choice. And while I’m firing up my machine to brew, I’ll start up my playlist to a section that best fits the task at hand.

With my steaming cup of goodness in hand, I sit down and just listen to the music for a few minutes. It’s almost like a meditation.

Once my mind is clear, it signifies that the creativity is ready to come out in full force. 

If I’m going to work on writing, I reread the last chapter I completed, much like hitting the rewind button on a movie for a quick recap. This helps me settle back into the story, and into my narrator’s head. 

Then, since I have the plot outlined — steps A-Z, beginning to end — I know where I need to go. And as I’m seeing the events unfolding like a movie, all I’m doing is transcribing everything I can.

My poetry and prose is somewhat similar, except I’m isolating events and packing as much emotion and life into the words as I can. 

If I’m editing, I still search for the right mindset of following along with a movie, because it’s important I don’t lose those critical attributes like pacing, but at the same time, I’m looking at the draft with a critical eye, zeroing in on plot holes,  continuity slip ups — like a character walking or standing still, or just issues with grammar and flow. 

However, I do want to note that when it comes to my fiction, I don’t mix writing with editing. If I’m working on the first draft of a manuscript, I won’t open a draft to start rereading or editing. I like to keep my concentration on one timeline so I don’t end up confusing things. 

Though I may switch to creating other things like book covers, or just stop altogether due to some other limitations, I try to give myself the flexibility to do so without berating myself or feeling like I’m neglecting anything.

The biggest impediments to my processes, however, is self-doubt. It could be that I’m going slower than usual because I can’t quite visualize something or transcribe it right, or I run into a wall where I begin to question a decision or an action. And then intrusive thoughts start to pop up like weeds in a garden. 

That’s a terrible idea. No one’s going to like that. 

Or: You might as well stop now, that thing is dead weight and you know it. 

I often have to remind myself that hiccups do happen and that whatever the problem is, I’ll find a way to fix it. 

If I let those overgrown thoughts blossom in that garden, it’ll take me that much longer to clean things up, stop beating myself up, and get back to what matters. 


Coming up, I’ll discuss how long I spend writing on a day and walk you through my writing day routine. 

Until next time,
Sarah

P. S. If you want to see for yourself what books I have to offer, find your FREE copies at your favorite retailer

P. P. S. If you are interested in learning more about me, my books, and other various, important topics on a monthly basis, along with access to a free, ever-growing resource library of downloadable content, sign up for my newsletter.

Earthen Witch, Poetry

Once Upon A Dream

“I saw him in a dream once.
And I didn’t know how,
but I knew he was the one for me.”

I didn’t know if it was
just a dream, or something more.
But, whatever it was,
I knew it was powerful.
And something I would never forget.
When the day came
that I finally met him,
I wondered why I ever
questioned it. He was
the one for me all along.

© Sarah Doughty
2018

A little something
inspired by my upcoming book,
Stronger Than Blood.

On Writing, Random Thoughts

Q&A With A Wordsmith: On Easter Eggs

Heya Lovelies,

As a writer taking a rather unique path, I often receive a wide range of questions. So far, I’ve covered some broad topics which you can find here and I’ll continue to shed some light on further questions. With luck, you’ll gain some understanding and insight along the way.

If you have a question you’d like me to answer, feel free to comment or drop me an email.


Question:
How do you weave Easter Eggs into your books? Is it a form of foreshadowing for you?

Answer:

Last week, I covered the basics of mysteries or, more accurately, revealing clues in an effective manner in the story as opposed to either giving away too much to fast, or not enough for too long. But when it comes to Easter eggs, that’s a  completely different story. 

Take season one of Stranger Things, as an example. When Hopper heads to the morgue to check Will’s body, he discovers that the guard — someone that shouldn’t have been there at all — was reading Cujo by Stephen King. As a means of distraction, he comments about it, only to punch the guy unconscious a moment later to gain access to the body. 

Now, contrary to what some people may think, neither this show nor its story is a creation of Stephen King’s mastermind, despite his creations — his books, movies, and television shows — being riddled with Easter eggs just like this. In fact, I read in an interview that the creators of the show are big fans of the legendary writer, so they made the decision to pay homage to him with a little egg of their own.

When I write those little nuggets of colorful goodness, odds are that I’m not doing it as part of a plot driver. And, To me, it’s not exactly a form of foreshadowing, either. At least, it’s not directly important to the overall plot. And since my published body of fiction writing has mostly revolved around one intertwined universe, those eggs are often thrown in as side note — something with very little fanfare or emphasis. 

Here and there in my books, you might come across something like an offhand mentioning of something in pop culture. For instance, in Safe, there’s a scene that refers to Alfred Hitchcock and two of his famous tales involving a disturbed motel owner and lots and lots of disruptive birds.

Leading up to Listen, there’s some very specific setting details and dialogue phrasing that are hidden in plain sight. Many people wouldn’t really think those things matter until that big reveal occurs. And suddenly, readers are experiencing facepalm moments and wondering why they missed these little tidbits and didn’t otherwise give them more thought. Yet, at the same time, knowing that big reveal was inevitable all along. In the interest of not disclosing any major spoilers, I’ll let you try to figure out what they were for yourself.

Those eggs were too insignificant (to me anyway) to serve as a specific foreshadowing, but in a way, I was still dangling the clues out there like low-lying fruit all along. 

While my Easter egg career is still in its infancy, I’ve still had tons of fun weaving them in. And I look forward to exploring other things I can incorporate into my tales. 

If you’re wondering if you can — or even should — throw in some into your own tales, then by all means, do so. They’re what you make of them. 


Coming up, I’ll cover the most difficult aspects of my artistic process and how I power through it. I’ll give you a hint: a big part of that is self doubt.

Until next time,
Sarah

P. S. If you want to see for yourself what books I have to offer, find your FREE copies at your favorite retailer

P. P. S. If you are interested in learning more about me, my books, and other various, important topics on a monthly basis, along with access to a free, ever-growing resource library of downloadable content, sign up for my newsletter.

On Writing, Random Thoughts

Q&A With A Wordsmith: Establishing Mystery

Heya Lovelies,

As a writer taking a rather unique path, I often receive a wide range of questions. So far, I’ve covered some broad topics which you can find here and I’ll continue to shed some light on further questions. With luck, you’ll gain some understanding and insight along the way.

If you have a question you’d like me to answer, feel free to comment or drop me an email.


Question:
How do you tackle the divide between making readers fill the blanks and revealing the mystery?

Answer:

Everyone loves a good mystery. But what makes a good mystery? I think it depends on what kind of mystery we, as readers, spectators, and the like, are absorbing. There’s a line between dropping pertinent clues to reveal the whodunnit at the end, and either giving too much away or not enough.

As writers, weaving our tales together, it’s our job to know where that divide is and how to best navigate it so we don’t end up either spoiling the surprise or turning our readers away because they don’t know WTF they’re reading. 

Consider this Venn diagram I whipped together to help illustrate what I mean.

Consider your story. What big questions  are you presenting that your readers are trying to answer as they progress? Or, allow me to rephrase: What spoilers do you want to keep under wraps until the time is right? Once you know the answer, consider how much you should reveal and when in order to keep your readers engaged.

Finally, if you’re hovering in that sweet spot, but trending towards an early reveal, consider throwing up some red herrings in the form of plot twists or misdirection if you’re wanting to add to the suspense. But only do this if you’re trying to rebalance your story. If you confuse your readers more than they already are, you’re likely to lose them altogether.

Consider this: You are the magician in your story. If your show is going as planned and your readers are engaged, keep their attention on something else while the real magic happens out of their line of sight and in the peripheries.

In Just Breathe the most obvious misdirection was the narrator herself. Aisling is just as clueless as the readers in the beginning of the story. As it progresses and Aisling learns more from her knowledgeable allies, things begin to fall into place. 

Now, my books aren’t murder mysteries, but there are some big questions that need answered. How can such a clueless newbie to the supernatural world survive a group of hunters that have excelled in their mission of killing her kind for centuries? A group that is so notorious, there are no known survivors once they were targeted? How can Aisling, psychologically and emotionally scarred as she is, face this reality and survive it?


Coming up, I’ll expand on the mystery aspects of storytelling and delve into the concept of Easter Eggs and how I weaved them into my books.

Until next time,
Sarah

P. S. If you want to see for yourself what books I have to offer, find your FREE copies at your favorite retailer

P. P. S. If you are interested in learning more about me, my books, and other various, important topics on a monthly basis, along with access to a free, ever-growing resource library of downloadable content, sign up for my newsletter.

On Writing, Random Thoughts

Q&A With A Wordsmith: On Readers

Heya Lovelies,

As a writer taking a rather unique path, I often receive a wide range of questions. So far, I’ve covered some broad topics which you can find here and I’ll continue to shed some light on further questions. With luck, you’ll gain some understanding and insight along the way.

If you have a question you’d like me to answer, feel free to comment or drop me an email.


Question:
What is an ideal reader and who is yours? Do you write original tales or cater to the wants of readers?

Answer:

Let me preface this by saying every author should have an ideal reader in mind when they write a book. Keep in mind that an ideal reader may change from one book to another, especially if you’re delving into different genres.

Here’s an example: in one theater, let’s say The Twilight Saga movie marathon is on the ticket, and the other is Star Wars. Picture the kind of viewers that will fill those seats in your head. Who are they? How old are they? Why do these groups look so different from one another? 

For Twilight, I see the tweens, teenagers, on up to mothers filling those seats with plenty of squeals when Edward Cullen shows his face. I’m willing to bet there’s a few males that were dragged into it against their will, too. Conversely, Star Wars would attract a more diverse audience. From baby boomers to older kids. There’s a much higher chance of finding males at this one, too. 

Now, picture your book as a movie. Who would you expect to see in your theater? Are they sci-fi buffs? Action seekers looking for high speed chases and gun fights? Or are they someone else entirely?

In a nutshell — that’s your ideal reader. You could dive in deeper to narrow down the age range and other demographics, but you don’t necessarily need to do so. 

My ideal reader for the Earthen Witch universe is females, roughly age 18 to 35. Why? Consider the genre. My books are a mix of urban fantasy and romance, with some definitive adult content. Since the heroines are also the narrators of their respective books, and they’re all in their early twenties, most older women may not be as interested in reading them. 

Why does this matter? Well, if you can’t pinpoint who will want to delve into your world, you’re going to struggle to find them. Simple as that.

When it comes to my books, I knew from the beginning that blending the two genres was an inherent risk. Some urban fantasy fans aren’t going to enjoy the *ahem* adult content as much as the romance fans would. Conversely, not all romance lovers enjoy dealing with witches, vampires, were-animals and more. But I did know one thing for sure: I LOVE that blended genre — Cat “Red Reaper” Crawfield anyone? Unfortunately, not many writers attempt it. 

I do know one thing: if I traipsed into a local bookstore and stumbled on a whole section of it, I’d be in heaven and happily melt my credit card to take them all home with me.

When it came to writing my books, I kept the stories as authentic to that as I could. Essentially, I wrote those books for me — and others like me. I wanted to pen a tale about a fantastical world with real, human emotional impact as if everything they experience is truly possible. 

Do I try to write original tales? Yes, to an extent. Do I cater to the wants of my ideal reader? Hells yes. And you should too.


Coming up, I’ll follow up on this question with another involving readers: how I tackle the divide between filling in the blanks and keeping the mystery intact in the story. 

Until next time,
Sarah

P. S. If you want to see for yourself what books I have to offer, find your FREE copies at your favorite retailer

P. P. S. If you are interested in learning more about me, my books, and other various, important topics on a monthly basis, along with access to a free, ever-growing resource library of downloadable content, sign up for my newsletter.

Earthen Witch, Updates

Introducing: Stronger Than Blood

Heya, Lovelies,

I’m so happy to introduce my next novel, Stronger Than Blood. This is the beginning of a new series within the Earthen Witch Universe, taking place immediately after the events in Safe.

Introducing: Stronger Than Blood
The first book of the Earthen Knight Novels

The Earthen Knight Novels are an adult urban fantasy romance series featuring Voodoo practitioner Marcelline “Marcy” Webster and vampire Liam, written from Marcy’s perspective. The mystery of Aisling Green’s world deepens with the discovery of what runs in Marcy’s veins. But that is only the beginning. If Aisling is going to succeed in her quest in reuniting the supernatural world, she’ll need Marcy’s help.


“Voodoo practitioner Marcy Webster thought her family’s massacre was the biggest of her worries when she flees New Orleans. But when she seeks asylum with the vampire known as Liam, she learns the truth goes much deeper.”

Raised by extended family in extreme poverty under the rule of New Orleans’ sadistic Voodoo Queen, Marcy Webster dreams of a better life for her family so they can live — and practice their own form of Voodoo — in peace. After the queen is killed, Marcy’s family is massacred by one gunman in the historic French Quarter. She’s forced to flee the city with her three younger cousins with the shooter in pursuit.

Armed with nothing more than a name — a vampire known as Liam living in Nashville, Indiana, an injured Marcy travels there with her cousins in hopes of finding the only people she believes might be willing to offer them asylum. The last thing she expects when they arrive is to recognize Liam as the man that’s haunted her dreams for as long as she can remember. But with Voodoo attacking by day, nightmares taunting by night, and her would-be killer closing in, that’s the least of her problems. Discovering the answers to why everything is happening is all written in her blood. Will she be able to face the man hunting her, embrace her own unique abilities to protect herself and keep the ones she loves safe before it’s too late?

Coming February 20th!


If you’re as excited as I am, I’d be honored if you take a moment to do any or all of the following:

  • Check it out and add it to Goodreads
  • Share the good news and drop the cover on social media
  • Reblog this post

Finally, if an extended sneak peek of Stronger Than Blood and other freebies in an ever-expanding resource library sounds appealing to you, sign up for my newsletter. Also, if you’d like to join my Beta team and be among the first to read an advance reader copy of this book, sign up here.

Until next time,
Sarah

P. S. All of my books are and will remain FREE at your favorite retailer.

On Writing, Random Thoughts

Q&A With A Wordsmith: On Manuscript Timelines

Heya Lovelies,

As a writer taking a rather unique path, I often receive a wide range of questions. So far, I’ve covered some broad topics which you can find here and I’ll continue to shed some light on further questions. With luck, you’ll gain some understanding and insight along the way.

If you have a question you’d like me to answer, feel free to comment or drop me an email.


Question:
How long does it take you to write a book?—What about your first published novel?

Answer:

From beginning to plot the story idea to the first draft’s The End, Just Breathe took roughly two months. How is such a thing possible, you ask? My health was such that I was often (and still am) plagued with migraines, insomnia, and anxiety, so I was unable to work. Because of that, my mother was generous enough to look after my son during the workdays my husband couldn’t be there to help me. That left me with a solid four hours, spread out over the course of the day and night after my son went to bed to write. 

To be honest, I was so focused on trying to put so much down in fear of losing my flow or falling away from my heroine’s true point of view, that I wouldn’t allow myself to do much of anything that wasn’t related to it in some way. So I wouldn’t recommend this single-minded focus to anyone that wants to finish their manuscript. Why? Burnout is a real thing and you will drive yourself into creative exhaustion.

And, I promise you, all that self-doubt is unfounded. The story is there whether you write furiously for several hours a day or only one. 

That being said, for those of you with a day job, if you can devote yourself to one thousand words to your manuscript per day, you could finish writing a 50k word book (that’s the standard NANOWRIMO length) in under two months. 

And I can tell you from all seven novels I’ve written, that when you plot first, you already know the story and what comes next. So it wouldn’t be difficult to transcribe the journey of your hero from spot A to B in one writing session and be ready for C to D the following day. By knowing the story first, I have dropped two or three thousand words in an hour without difficulty on many occasions.

As for my most recent manuscript, I took roughly five days to plot it out, and then wrote in the mornings (when I was well enough to write, of course) when my son began fifth grade in August. I took the evenings and weekends off to recharge and still managed to reach The End … for now before the beginning of October. 

So the next time you dream up a book to write, don’t think about the daunting task of writing so many words. Develop what happens first, then write it in small sections

For instance, using Just Breathe as reference, the first chapter was divided into three scenes. First, the heroine and her best friend were introduced in the library. The second was a brief trip down memory lane. And finally, the next scene picks up after they leave a restaurant and our heroine sees the hero for the first time. Each scene was roughly one thousand words, written separately.  

Since I edited my books, this process took about twice as long as the actual writing. With each pass, I went from fixing big errors like plot holes, and continued passing through, addressing smaller issues each time, right down to the grammar, until I felt like everything was right. 

Somewhere along this line, I worked on book cover creation, sharing on social media, and generally preparing for the book’s launch. Once all of that is finished, it’s basically just a matter of scheduling the date of its publication. If you’re publishing traditionally, this process may take far longer, but just remember: nothing is impossible. 


Coming up, I’ll discuss the differences between uniqueness in a story and how I account for my ideal readers’ preferences.

Until next time,
Sarah

P. S. If you want to see for yourself what books I have to offer, find your FREE copies at your favorite retailer

P. P. S. If you are interested in learning more about me, my books, and other various, important topics on a monthly basis, along with access to a free, ever-growing resource library of downloadable content, sign up for my newsletter.

On Writing, Random Thoughts

Q&A With A Wordsmith: On Manuscript Failures

Heya Lovelies,

As a writer taking a rather unique path, I often receive a wide range of questions. So far, I’ve covered some broad topics which you can find here and I’ll continue to shed some light on further questions. With luck, you’ll gain some understanding and insight along the way.

If you have a question you’d like me to answer, feel free to comment or drop me an email.


Question:

How many unpublished drafts and unfinished manuscripts do you have? Did the process of writing these differ from your published books?

Answer:

Imagine this scenario — a brilliant I’m a genius idea comes to mind and you begin writing. But halfway through (sometimes less, sometimes more) you lose all your steam and grasp at empty space on where the plot will go next. Or there’s just this nagging feeling that something isn’t right, yet you can’t put your finger on it. That genius feeling quickly sours into one of those Debbie Downer waw-wah sounds. 

That was me for most of my life. Without so much as brainstorming the evolution of the plot, developing characters, or anything really. I just started writing, pantsing my way through the whole thing. I truly thought, with every new attempt, that the characters would reveal themselves and that the story would carry them through to The End. But that was never the case. 

In 2014, when my health — both physical and mental — took its toll and forced me out of work, I decided to do it right. Giving myself plenty of space to rest through those wicked migraines or relax after a panic attack, I studied the craft. I read advice written by authors I knew and admired for their stories. I took diligent notes. Read up on the Snowflake Method, and much more. 

Once I felt like I had the tools necessary to actually write a manuscript from beginning to end, I began the plotting phase. The genesis of the idea was there for a few years after a dream and I knew at least where I wanted to start. 

In order to keep a digital record of the plotting process, I created a comprehensive OneNote template that allowed me to assess each aspect of the story I needed to understand and cover — which I will share in more detail in a separate series if you’d like to learn about it. 

I remembered reading this tidbit from a now defunct blog from Maggie Stiefvater. In it, she said Divine Coincidence should be rare and that a story’s characters need to go from A (the beginning) to Z (The End) through their own motivations. 

So that’s what I did. 

The brainstorming took the bulk of the plotting time. As I moved from characters to settings and back to the plot, I filled in what I could in my fresh template, and even used a fresh notebook to jot down notes, writing in any big events I already saw in my head. Then I tried to find scenes that would bring my characters from one event to the next.

I created the stepping stones my heroine needed, while still providing her arc. Once I felt the story was more or less ready, since I already knew what needed to happen with each scene, I began writing. 

That process hasn’t failed me since. 


Coming up, I’ll explain the time it takes to go from plotting to The End … for now, the editing to published as well, and give you some insights on how that has changed since Just Breathe.

Until next time,
Sarah

P. S. If you want to see for yourself what books I have to offer, find your FREE copies at your favorite retailer

P. P. S. If you are interested in learning more about me, my books, and other various, important topics on a monthly basis, along with access to a free, ever-growing resource library of downloadable content, sign up for my newsletter.

On Writing, Random Thoughts

Q&A With A Wordsmith: On Writerly Evolution

Heya Lovelies,

As a writer taking a rather unique path, I often receive a wide range of questions. So far, I’ve covered some broad personal writerly things like my museinspiration, and process. I’ll continue to shed some light on these questions. With luck, you’ll gain some understanding and insight along the way.

If you have a question you’d like me to answer, feel free to comment or drop me an email.


Question:

How did you write your first published novel and what, if anything, has changed since then?

Answer:

My first published novel was approached with equal parts immense trepidation and fierce determination. I knew that I had a story worth telling and I needed to do it right so that I could share it with the world. So I was careful, meticulous with my plot and character development and when I understood that, logically, I was ready to begin writing, I began.

However, rather than delving into my development methodology — which I plan to delve into in the future — I’m going to discuss the tools I implemented in the drafting and editing processes.

First, since I am proficient with a keyboard (hello instant messaging from around the turn of the millennium) and have experience with editing, I worried that I might run into a self-editing spiral if given the opportunity to dwell on my draft, which I had done before. So my solution was to write the draft long-hand.

Yes, you read that right.

I still divided everything into manageable scenes, as I mentioned in last week’s Q&A session but I ended up with about two reams of filled, one-sided loose-leaf paper. At the end of the day’s writing or in between scenes, depending on how the day progressed, I typed them out, leaving the majority of the glaring issues intact for a later date. 

When the draft (and the subsequent emotional outburst of happy exhilaration) was finished, I printed those scenes out, double spaced and invested in about two dozen red pens to hack, slash, refine, and perfect (it was a mess, to say the least). Upon completing that arduous task, I created a new file, compiled the same scenes I printed into one large document, and then I implemented those changes. Though I refrained from printing out the book multiple times, I did create new files with each subsequent pass of editing that came afterwards. 

I didn’t stop that process until I felt confident in the story — that I could replay it in my head as if I was watching a movie and have everything lined up just so. 

It wasn’t until I reached roughly a third of the draft from my second book, that I decided the hand-written-to-typed approach wasn’t necessary. Mostly because it felt more redundant than helpful. I’d somehow broken that dreaded cycle of editing. So I put the blank pages back on the shelf and just typed as fast as my fingers could go. 

That process of writing individual scenes separately never changed, but I still feel comfortable with skipping the pen and paper routine. 

The same holds true with the completed first draft. Rather than printing that beast, I edit the files, saving those versions individually to keep the various drafts intact. That way I can go back to check the evolution if I ever need or want to do so, while at the same time, hopefully preventing the death of a few trees in the process.


Coming up, I’ll share some thoughts about my previous book failures and elaborate on why they landed in my discard pile, so to speak.

Until next time,
Sarah

P. S. If you want to see for yourself what books I have to offer, find your FREE copies at your favorite retailer

P. P. S. If you are interested in learning more about me, my books, and other various, important topics on a monthly basis, along with access to a free, ever-growing resource library of downloadable content, sign up for my newsletter.