Updates

Indie Blu(e) — Kindra M. Austin

Kindra M. Austin is one of those writers that can send tingles up and down your back with just a few words:

I can’t drive past
a dead animal splayed
and stinking on the side
of the road in the summer heat
without thinking of you….
[Dreadful]

She’s also one hell of a friend.

Her biography, and a listing of her published books, can be found at Indie Blu(e). So be sure to check it out.

~ Sarah Doughty

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Updates

Indie Blu(e) is Recruiting Member Authors

Indie Blu(e) is such an exciting
new site dedicated to
Indie writers and their books. 

Yesterday, you read about
a call for readers and reviewers
for writers of Indie Blu(e).

Today, I’m sending out
a call for writers.
Indie writers.
Are you wanting to join
this community
and make a positive change?

Head over here and get started.

~ Sarah Doughty

Updates

Help Wanted: Book Reviewers for Indie Blu(e)

Indie Blu(e) is such an exciting
new site dedicated to
Indie writers and their books. 

As many independent writers know,
reviews and exposure mean the difference
between having their books seen
or having them fall into an oblivion
of millions of other books.

Let’s work together and help them
stand out a little brighter.

Click here to learn more about
Indie Blu(e) and how you can help.

~ Sarah Doughty

PTSD and Awareness, Updates

Blood Into Ink: Your Writing Wanted

The incredible people at Blood Into Ink are looking for guest writers to submit pieces that coincide with the backbone of their collective effort: surviving and overcoming all forms of abuse or neglect. It is a safe space to share stories, connect with other survivors, and be a part of a community that understands what it means to survive. I’m honored to participate in this collaborative. If you’re interested in learning more, click here.

Random Thoughts

The Dreaded Block

“The words may be on a break. But they’ll
be back. They always come back.”
Returning

I’m often asked about writer’s block. What to do? How to overcome it? How long will it last? These are all good questions, but they only really need one answer. Keep writing. Every day.

You may feel uninspired, like nothing you put on paper or type on the screen holds any value, but odds are, there is something there. Don’t delete them or throw them away. And the worst thing you can do is to put the pen away and do nothing.

There’s millions of things you can try to wake up your muse, but even if your mind comes up blank, you should write something. Even if it’s only a journal of what happened during your day.

My first fiction novel, Just Breathe, was based on a dream. Back then, I tended to forget my dreams and move on, but I was fortunate enough to journal the next day, and my mind kept going back to that scene. My focus shifted, and the story began to unfold. So, lovelies, don’t ignore your muse when it stirs, you might miss something incredible.

© Sarah Doughty

In the comments, let me know what you do to overcome creative blocks.

Updates

November Notes 2017

Back by popular demand, the 2017 November Notes challenge is here!

Each day, during the month of November, write a poem inspired by that day’s corresponding song. Write what the sound makes you feel. How the lyrics move you. Anything that awakens your muse.

I’ve teamed up with the lovely Máh of @mah.writes and Rosema of @areadingwriter for this challenge, so be sure to follow them if you aren’t already. Use the #NovemberNotes tag and ping back to this post to make sure I don’t miss any of your pieces! Have fun!

I’ve added the list of songs below,
and I’ve included the image for easy reference
at the bottom of this post.
To listen to the songs on Spotify, click here.

1. The Night We Met – Lord Huron
2. New Rules – Dua Lipa
3. Wilderness – Jon Bryant
4. All the Pretty Girls  – Kaleo
5. Unbreakable Smile – Tori Kelly
6. Wild Heart – The Bleachers feat. Sara Bareilles
7. Holocene – Bon Iver
8. 1-800-273-8255 – Logic ft. Alessia Cara & Khalid
9. Broken Vessels – Hillsong United
10. Wise Enough – Lamb
11. What About Us – P!nk
12. Too Good at Goodbyes – Sam Smith
13. If I Be Wrong- Wolf Larsen
14. Don’t Speak – No Doubt
15. Headlights – Dave Barnes
16. Words As Weapons – Birdy
17. Possession – Sarah McLachlan
18. Chariot – Jacob Lee
19. Midnight – Coldplay
20. Wreck of the Day – Anna Nalick
21. Great Escape – Gavin James
22. Letter Never Sent – Young summer
23. Heal Over – KT Tunstall
24. Like the Wind – Triosence, Sara Gazarek
25. Tethered – Sleeping At Last
26. I’m Confessin’ – Lizz Wright
27. Hide and Seek – Fatai
28. Into the Night – Beacon
29. Just Hold Me – Maria Mena
30. Break the Shell – India Arie

Updates

Submit To Whisper and the Roar

Whisper and the Roar is accepting submissions from feminist writers or pieces involving feminism or empowerment. Head to the link below for more details.

Source: Your Writing Wanted: Whisper and the Roar

Updates

Sudden Denouement Is Recruiting

Sudden Denouement is a community of like-minded individuals who strive to share and promote each other’s writing.

But really, it’s so much more than that. They also happen to publish books from some pretty incredible people.

So if you’re a writer interested in joining this collective, either as a guest or a contributor, head to the link below to get acquainted with Sudden Denouement and find out how you can be a part of it.

Source: Sudden Denouement is seeking new writers

Random Thoughts

Discussion of “IT”

*Minor spoikers ahead. Proceed with caution.**
The thoughts expressed here are mine.

This was written in response to the discussion posted by Tyson Adams.

I was a fan of the Goosebumps books when I was six. So naturally I thought I was perfectly capable of handling the “It” miniseries when it was released. To say I was terrified was an understatement. But I was hooked. I dropped those Goosebumps like a bad habit and started reading Stephen King.

It, the book, was quite engrossing, but not so much scary. I liked the way the news reports were presented, and even the narrative of Pennywise gave us a new way of seeing him. But the chemistry with the Loser’s Club was really the core of it. Of course, there was that strange scene near the end of the kid’s journey that unified them and allowed them to become adults all in one go. Let’s just say, King’s voice of how was quite the odd method of achieving that goal. But otherwise, I rather enjoyed the story.

I’ve seen the miniseries from time to time over the years and remember those frights with fond appreciation. But I waited to watch “It” again in favor of having a somewhat cleansed palette. The theatrical version was so far beyond what I’d hoped for, that I saw it again a second time this past weekend. (Trust me, having C-PTSD and carefully planning an excursion into a dark theater full of people wasn’t easy.) The new Pennywise isn’t like Tim Curry’s portrayal, where he was apt to start cracking jokes, playing on actual clown humor around the few “scary” moments where he appeared as period-specific monsters.

Bill Skarsgard’s version is childlike in nature, but he has a deep hatred for kids. You can tell from the first, and notably more infamous “Georgie” scene. The way he terrifies his victims before attacking them is almost like marinating his food just the way he likes, and when the kids are good and terrified, he’s ready to save them for hibernation time. And he does this in various forms, depending on the individual fears of that child. For instance, rather than seeing Pennywise as the wolfman, Ritchie is just afraid of clowns, and naturally gets stuck in a room full of them. This adds a bit of timelessness to the movie. But when It is ready to take them for good, he toys with the kids in an almost animalistic way, much like a lion might play with a gazelle before ripping out its throat. But when he does this, his movements, voice, and abilities to shift reality are erratic, sometimes disturbingly fast, and very unpredictable, which is ultimately what makes this Pennywise so terrifying.

Of course, after my second viewing of the new movie, I went back to watch to miniseries. I have to say, the miniseries doesn’t do the movie justice. I spent most of my time rolling my eyes at the horrid acting (aside from Curry’s portrayal) and wondering how I was actually that scared at all in the first place. But the eyes of a young child, see much differently than adults. I can’t imagine how kids will react to this movie. I’m certain I won’t be allowing my son to see it until he’s at least the same age as the Loser’s Club.

© Sarah Doughty

Random Thoughts

Spectrums Of Writing

This was written as part of a discussion with the lovely Mandie Hines.

I think spectrums are everywhere, involving a great many things. When I started down this path of sharing my writing, I did it with the “fake it till you make it” idea in mind.

Outside of a few random pieces in high school and university, I’d never been published professionally before. But I wanted people to know I was serious about what I was doing. Yet, my confidence was very low. Showing that vulnerability wouldn’t quite be faking it, would it?

So I kept my head high and pushed through the anxiety that came with every post. Eventually, as I worked on my first novel, and my number of followers was growing, that anxiety eased. Eventually, it stopped. Several published (albeit free e-books only) books later, I feel I can safely say that I’m a writer now.

However, my confidence level hadn’t really changed much. Sure, I can see when people are just starting out, or if English isn’t their first language, but that doesn’t mean they can’t grow and learn. And when people do approach me, often on Instagram DM, they ask for advice or help because they see me as an authority figure. Or that I’m famous. A household name. But I’m no Stephen King. Even he, a repeating member of the #1 New York Times Bestseller club, says he’s the “literary equivalent of a cheeseburger and fries.” If that’s true, I’m the moldy cheese underneath a toddler’s carseat in a minivan.

I don’t think I’m better than anyone else, and I certainly don’t put myself in the category of being pretentious. There are several writers on Instagram that share parody pieces that is not only meant to insult readers, but the writers with a similar style. I cannot stand it when people do this, and I’ve spoken out against it before a few times. Art is subjective and not everyone is going to love a writer’s work. The same goes for Stephen King. Or J.K. Rowling. I see no reason why I should think I’ve hit some arbitrary milestone that makes me better than anyone else.

© Sarah Doughty