PTSD and Awareness

Thirteen Reasons Why Discussion #1

**Trigger Warning — This post covers a broad spectrum of potentially triggering topics, such as abuse, bullying, sexual assault, and suicide. Please read with caution. If you need to find help for any reason, go to 13ReasonsWhy.info.**

After introducing this series, this will serve as the first of insightful discussion posts surrounding the controversial show, Thirteen Reasons Why.

The Problems: Part One

To begin, one of my biggest issues with Thirteen Reasons Why was the lack of proper warnings. When the show was first released to Netflix, I saw the preview. It was the first thing that started to play when I opened it. And of course, it caught my attention right away. I didn’t know it was a bestselling mystery, (except that the trailer mentioned it was) nor did I know what that book was about.

It portrayed a tale about a girl that killed herself, and a question: Why would a dead girl lie? Small segments of the show played, which portrayed Hannah’s various stages of decline, but nothing about what happens to her.

“Don’t believe everything you hear,” one girl says.

Then, in what appears to be a heated conversation, a boy rushes, “She was just a crazy drama queen who killed herself for attention.”

The preview goes on to indicate that they (the ones alive) are afraid of the truth. And that they should be.

When the trailer ended, I was intrigued enough to add it to my list, but I didn’t start watching right away. I was left with a sense that maybe this girl witnessed some kind of murder and her secrets were what ultimately killed her. Though my assumption wasn’t entirely wrong, I was unaware of just how much of an emotional train ride I was about to take.

After a few days, I decided it was time to start watching. From the start, we know a girl is dead as a result of suicide. This brings me to my next two issues.

From the beginning of episode one, they should have included a small warning about suicide and any other triggering issues that might arise in that particular episode, including a resource for people who might need help if the content stirred up too much emotion in them. As of my last viewing, this was not addressed, despite Netflix’s statement promising that they would do so.

The resource page listed above for people who need help was only mentioned in “Beyond The Reason” which was a short documentary that came after the show’s season finale (which includes spoilers). Three episodes included warnings at the beginning. Three. Granted, these were the hardest episodes to watch, but something should have been included in other episodes as well.

Why do I think these three things are a problem? Because people are going to start watching this show, not realizing what they’re getting into before it’s too late. By the time I started piecing together where the story was headed, I was invested in the characters. What happened? Who did what? And ultimately, what was so bad that this girl saw no other way out?

I knew it would be an emotional journey, and my past experiences of abuse had little to do with Hannah Baker’s. But there were situations I related to. There were certain aspects of Hannah’s pain that resembles mine (both then and now) in a way that I felt like I knew exactly how she felt and what was going on in certain situations. I grieved for her, not just because I could relate to how she felt, but because there are so many other girls that have experienced the same thing, or will in the future. Without a lifeline, I don’t know where I would have ended up. I could only imagine how difficult it would be for someone dealing with similar issues as Hannah in school right now, or if they’ve experienced something similar in the past.

If someone already struggling begins watching this show, they could end up in a spiral of emotions, triggers, and a sleuth of other things that comes naturally with victims and sufferers of PTSD. This is why I can’t blindly recommend that everyone should watch this show. To say so would be irresponsible and potentially dangerous.

So, yes, Netflix and the showrunners could have done a better job preparing people for what was coming. I think there’s enough buzz going around that people are more aware than I was about the show’s content, but I think those things should still be addressed.

Β© Sarah Doughty

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112 thoughts on “Thirteen Reasons Why Discussion #1”

  1. Hey! I read the book long back. And just watched the show(I loved it soooo much!). And I totally agree with you. There should’ve been some warnings or something sort of. Maybe they’ll have ’em in the second season. But as per entertainment standards don’t you think that the show was so well- scripted and engrossing. I know it might be tough for some people. But the reason behind most of the public watching was entertainment, I suppose. The show did good in that case. Right!?
    Anyways, Enjoyed reading the article… it was an engaging one! Thank you for sharing!

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    1. In a way, it does. But also, considering what Hannah dealt with and for how long, the use of the tapes might have started and ended with a sort of revenge plot. However, after they were created, Hannah felt a sense of hope, something strong enough to seek help. When her attempt fails, she continues her plan. The point isn’t whether or not it was romanticizing suicide. The point is that suicide isn’t discussed enough. Unfortunately, many young people don’t know what kinds of options they have, if they begin to feel as Hannah did. The entire point, or the core of both the book and the show, is to start conversations that may save lives.

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      1. There has to be more open conversations about depression and feeling suicidal for sure, no question about it. However I think that using depression as an excuse is becoming more prevalent day by day. And don’t get me wrong, I understand that depression is a sickness, that it handicaps people in many different ways, but many people who are not really in depression use it as an excuse for mediocrity. I think thirteen reasons why, as you pointed out, is popular among the youth and has made being in depression almost something ‘cool’. Being in depression is not cool. I feel that while the show has tried to start conversions, this has been one of the by products.

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      2. I do think you’re right. Sometimes people use their knowledge of certain things to their advantage, as if pretending depression is something real they’re dealing with. But all of these matters should be considered real unless evidence proves otherwise. Because if one person is ignored for suspicions of faking depression, and they actually are, that may push them even closer to the edge. It’s a tricky subject for sure.

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  2. I finished the series maybe 6 weeks ago with a heavy heart. And unlike some viewers, I didn’t watch it all in one go or on consecutive days. I think I probably watched about 5 or 6 episodes before I decided that I actually needed a week break from it before resuming to finish the rest! I kid you not, I cried a bit on the last two episodes and there was one particular scene that I couldn’t watch (I actually covered my eyes, listening to it was hard enough).

    I totally agree that there should have been a warning. I didn’t know what to expect or just how heavy they’d go on the subject…but saying that, I also appreciate that they did because not a lot of material go into that much depth. Especially concerning a series of high schoolers, one would expect the clichΓ©s or usual drama, but the onslaught of emotions in this series are strong and not over-dramatised – it’s really happening which is what hits you.

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      1. Exactly! I’ve even seen comments of how this isn’t a correct representation of mental health and/or suicide. It’s not realistic. That some of the reasons Hannah got upset by was a bit too much and didn’t need that outcome/reaction. But it’s ironic isn’t it? It’s exactly this type of arrogant attitude that pushes people to the brink.

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      2. Yes, exactly. For a teenager, I remember some people reacting in the way she did to certain situations. She was imperfect and in the end, she didn’t have anyone to remind her how much she was loved.

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  3. Every trigger should’t be taken lightly, specially with those who are not very close to you. This may have devastating affects, the way it had in the book. I loved the book and the article as well.

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  4. 13 Reasons Why: Deep.

    This film opened my eyes on so many levels as a parent and counselor. I know what some of those things she experienced feels like from my experiences as a teen. I was very emotional watching this series.

    Yes, I agree with you. They should have given a warning because just like you-I became invested in the storyline and characters from the beginning.

    Parents if you haven’t watched this, please do. Try to get the message behind it. Bullying is serious and can ruin a person’s life. Rape can ruin a person’s life. Suicide should be taken serious. Know the risks and signs. With the youth, it’s important to listen to the things that we believe are small because to them, those small things are huge in their world.

    Thanks for sharing!

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    1. Definitely, I agree. Some parents, or adults in general may not be able to handle the triggers this series might bring up for them. It’s always best to proceed with caution. But it is important to understand how these things can effect anyone, not just teens. πŸ™‚

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  5. Very interesting post! I have not seen the show yet, but I am planning on reading the book before I attempt the show. I cannot believe they wouldn’t have sufficient trigger warnings and resource info at the beginning of this show… I hope they address this ASAP

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  6. Agree on every point. I think people don’t understand triggers and the effect they have, it’s just not comprehensible for anyone who hasn’t experienced it. Maybe if they had a consultant on board they’d have understood. There were many things I felt were off about the show too

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    1. That’s the thing. They had consultants and psychiatrists on hand to walk actors and writers through all the little details. It was the decision of showrunners or Netflix not to include those extra warnings or the resources for getting help. There were certain things they did wrong, which I will discuss, and there were many they did right (and glossed over on purpose), which I’ll discuss too. I just think they would have known better than to let people jump into the show blind. Themes of suicide might not be enough. I know for me, the sexual assault issues and the bullying/slut-shaming were much worse for me than the suicide. Those were the things I didn’t know were going to be in the show, and I was sucked in too deep before I began to see how bad things were going to get. And, silly me, I thought, it’s a teen show, they’re not going to show too much. Right? No.

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      1. Lord in heaven they had that? I would NOT have thought watching it that they had ANY consultants, I did not feel there was the necessary sensitivity or warnings/considerations around the subject matter by any means and it was far too viseral, which I could on the one hand appreciate because of the shock factor but really knew could lead to a bad place especially among young minds. I felt as you did that they did some wrongs and some rights for sure, I did feel they did not go into the bullying or the obvious underlying depression enough so it almost seemed inexplicable why she should take her life (I was less surprised by the boy who did at the end) and I didn’t feel they developed her (reasons) enough as well as really, the main boy he was more likely in a way, so it just became a bit blurred I suppose in terms of trying to understand motivation though I think often this IS true. The slut-shaming were definitely worse for me too than the suicide as far as triggers but then again I’ve not seen such a graphic suicide before except I think Virgin Suicides was pretty bad and I recall I Spit On Your Grace (but that’s a HORROR rape-revenge movie) so for the genre it was aiming at, mmm maybe too much although would put me off seeing it. I don’t know I was definitely disappointed ultimately though glad they ‘tried’ I didn’t think it got it right but better than nothing/not trying? Yeah like you I thought teen show immature surely not and then WHAM the rape scene in the hot tub especially her face damn. I think too much was glossed over as you said. really interested to read what else you think loved your thoughts on this.

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      2. Yeah, consultants were there, and having been through the things I’ve experienced, I understood exactly how Hannah felt in about 95% of the show. If you consider where she was in episode 1 vs. where she was with Clay in 11, she was a completely different person. Comparing episode 11 to 12 and then 13, she degraded even more. That’s how much those people took her value and turned her into an object rather than treated her like a person. And her face in the hot tub, they did that on purpose. If you watch “Beyond The Reasons” which is a short documentary that people are supposed to watch after the season finale, you’ll see more insights as to what was going on with Hannah and why they made the choices they made (for instance, “camera stays on Hannah’s face for longer than is comfortable” (um yeah) or, her ever-growing PTSD and how she reacted as the show progressed (fight, flight, freeze), the debate over her suicide, and that they showed it because there’s nothing good about it — they wanted people to see how horrible it was for Hannah, her parents, and all the people she left behind.)

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      3. Yeah, she dissociated. I knew it as soon as I saw her go limp. She even mentioned it as she narrated her tape. She something to the extent that she felt like she was apart from herself and she lost all control.

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      4. Right? I think you understand on a very real level that others writing may miss, that’s why what you have to say is very valuable and important – pls write more on this I love your perspective and truth

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  7. While the Netflix et al streaming model is often unsettling, full of excess in any direction from profanity to violence to places we don’t really want to go, “entertainment”, like religion and abortion and start stacking all the social hot buttons here, are a matter of not only choice, but the courage of one’s convictions. The trailers and the partial synopsis of shows can be misleading, but do we make everyone a victim with a blanket, four mile long ADA disclaimer on the front end of everything? This show is about a girl who commits suicide and contains adult content. That should be enough. If curiosity pulls one through the door, the ‘enter at your own risk’ sign was there. As you said, one can hit the off switch, back out, bail. Perhaps Captain Kangaroo and the bunny rabbit being abused by ping pong balls is a trigger for someone with PTSD from a father with Olympic hopeful ping pong dreams for them. I do not say that lightly or in jest. However there is a point where ludicrous rears its head.

    Dig this. Animals are safer in front of a camera than women. Hamsters have more rights not to suffer indignation than women. Unite with one voice. Fix that. Then we’ll talk about entertainment things that involve choice.

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    1. I understand your point. When I first watched this show, it didn’t have a TV-MA rating. I don’t recall if it was TV-14 or just not rated, but I went in thinking I’d experience something much different than I did. That said, I know I could have stopped at any time, but I wasn’t the one that was seriously impacted by the content. In your example, generally speaking, PTSD would be triggered by the consequences of a parent’s actions, not what they wanted their kids to do. So, ping pong balls would have less of an impact as say, a depiction of a father beating his child for doing something wrong. I agree that women are in need of help. That social stigmas and common shaming that’s involved are big problems and they need addressed. That’s one of the reasons why I’m discussing this show. The conversations need to change. The way women are treated need to change. And, if we’re lucky, shows like this will get the conversation started. It’s not just about preventing suicide. There’s a whole sleuth of topics that need to be discussed.

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      1. The ping pong balls really weren’t facetious. What one experiences drives their response. Forcing a child to play tennis until they vomit and pass out, throw a football until they can’t raise their arm, screaming at them the entire time is as damaging as any other form of abuse. Having a crazy parent who makes the dinner table a nightmare for twelve years will bring on anorexia or bulimia. My greater point, based on what I see all over the internet this May, is that people need to keep their eyes on the prize and not project this or that disorder as a headliner.

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      2. I understand what you mean. These specific triggers are unique to everyone. For me, I’m triggered by the sound of someone coming up the stairs. But it wasn’t the stairs that hurt me. It was what came after. These generalized warnings at the start of such an intense show should be included, or, they need to do a better job of letting people know what they’re in for. Some kind of clue, like a photo being shared across the school, or the way the boys trailed behind Hannah making lewd gestures would have been clues to indicate what might have been in store for her. Some of these, especially if teens or recent graduates are watching this show, could be extremely damaging, bringing up those past memories and bringing them all to the surface all at once. I have a friend who is struggling just as much as I am, but she wasn’t abused in the same way I was as a child. She was belittled and punished, of course, but the rapes came later, from her peers. She told me she was considering watching this show, and I had to explain that it wasn’t what it appears to be. Once I gave a general overview, she agreed that watching it would have most likely triggered her into a spiral. And she’s already fighting every day to find reasons to stay alive.

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    1. I understand. Not every show is this intense or HBO style with the maturity level, but many of them are. I think having the ability to make television without those limitations allows them to produce those more mature programs.

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  8. i have watched only two episodes but i heard the suicide part is really really disturbing. like what we discussed, it is needed to show it is ugly but i agree with you. they should be extra careful as this story is not new. this happens in real life. admire what you are doing, love. ❀ may this help create the noise for them to be responsible.

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  9. Very incisive! I knew about the book when it came out – it was a huge success. But, I always had my reservations to read the book because of my past depression and continuous anxiety. Now, with the show being a big success as well, I still have my reservations. I feel like the show will be a huge trigger for me, so I’ve made up my mind to stay away. I’m glad some people who have faced similar challenges that are discussed on the show, are watching the show, so others can have informed feedback. So, thanks for the great post!

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  10. I’m so glad you posted this! I hadn’t seen this advertised on Netflix, but a bulletin was sent home from the kid’s school, thankfully, outlining much of what you have mentioned, suggesting if parent’s wanted their children to watch, they should be with them as it is not “children’s show”. It is, in my opinion, not something younger teens even should watch alone. It would be exceedingly upsetting particularly to anyone who has dealt with this issue. Appreciate your considerate and notewrothy comment, Sarah. Thank you.

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    1. Definitely, when I saw it was supposed to be for teens, and then watched it, it was much heavier than what a teen show should be. There’s a reason schools are scared, and they should be, but probably not for the reason you’re thinking. But I think it’s good for parents to watch this with their teens, if they want to watch it, so there can be communication about it.

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      1. My kids never watched tv whether it was a cartoon or Disney or anything else without me because I wanted to make sure they understood the message of the program. Often (my grandkids) seem to get the wrong message (which is understandable) foolishness is their middle name and if they see something foolish they tend to copy it. So, needless to say I brought the information to my daughter’s attention so she could program netflix properly (or rather my son) can do it for her and exclude this one. πŸ™‚ that makes me happy :):)

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      2. That can be a good or bad thing. πŸ™‚ Depending on interpretation, but still, your a wise woman and you’ve grown into a beautiful one as well. Your very precious Sarah! In my eyes and many others too!

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    1. If you look at the comments, not everyone fully understands what a trigger warning is and why they are important. Of people know more going in, and what awaits in each episode, people can be better prepared for what they’ll witness.

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  11. Wow very lively discussion going on here! I’m in half a mind to agree- because yes there should have been something like “viewer discretion is advised” on something where this is the central issue in general- that is currently the standard practice as far as I’m aware. I also have to add I haven’t seen the show- so I don’t know if they do in the UK which is putting advice at the end for where to seek help if affected by the issues in the show. However, I’m going to have to throw a curveball into the mix and say that sticking a trigger warning on it specifically might not be all that helpful- there are psychologists who are currently arguing against such warning labels on art, because it can have the opposite effect to the one it hopes to achieve (reinforcing rather than reducing PTSD)- but I plan to do a full post at some point discussing this, as I realise it’s a highly sensitive and controversial issue right now.

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  12. I haven’t seen the show, but I’m surprised that they don’t have a “Due to content, viewer’s discretion is advised” type of thing before the episode begins. Maybe they thought because it was on Netflix, they didn’t need to add it? *shrugs* I don’t know.

    I know a warning like that is kind of vague, but it would at least be a fair start.

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    1. I agree. Not every episode is heavy (there are three in particular that are incredibly difficult to watch) but the whole overarching theme of what happens, aside from the suicide, includes bullying, slut shaming, and so much more. These things alone could stir up some intense emotions in people.

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      1. By the way, I just finished Just Breathe. And I loved Martin’s well-deserved demise, Liam shouting sense into Connor, Shadow typing on the computer, Angela + Salvatore (oh my gosh cute), and the vampires repairing Aisling’s house (the mental image of them hammering nails and setting doors makes me happy). I’m so ready to move on to the next book. Good thing I already have it uploaded into my Nook. πŸ˜‰

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  13. Fantastic post!! I have seen this show plastered all over Netflix, but haven’t actually watched it. Not entirely sure that I want to. Not because I think I may relate to anything in it…although there was a point in my life when I was in my twenties that I had contemplated suicide, but just that I think there has been too much hype over this show. I do think though that this show should come with some kind of warning if it’s really as bad as you are saying. In my opinion I think they should have the warning on every episode regardless. β™₯

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    1. Well, I have to say that I began to feel where the show was headed in the first episode, and more so as it went on, but there was also a deep connection with the characters. The questions, the people themselves. They felt very real. And by the time I knew I was on a train about to derail, I couldn’t look away. I needed to know the rest. There may be hype, either good or bad, but the characters and situations are very realistic. And that’s the scary thing.

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  14. I think it is important to talk about this. Depression/abuse/suicide are no light topics and not discussed enough. Specially suicide.Where I studied was a famous spot for jumpers. I remember classes getting cancelled cos people passed. And once talking about it, I remember a professor said it was because talking about suicides in that building (on the media and such) could trigger more suicides. But I always thought and the awareness? And the need to offer help? They just hid it away afraid of the next time it would happen without considering that talking about it and offering help could be beneficial to someone. So I value your initiative. Much love Sarah.

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    1. Thanks, love. That’s what bothers me. The silence, the lack of resources or knowledge that there even are resources available to people, are big problems. My son’s school sent out emails warning parents about the show, which I’m fine with, but the fact that they threw in a little tidbit about trusting their staff just didn’t sit right with me. Of course, this is something I’ll explain in more detail later. I’m glad to know you agree there’s issues with society and that silence isn’t going to help anything.

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      1. Absolutely. It sorta boils down to emotional management, we aren’t really taught that. And society, in general, is scared of people who commit suicide cos they sorta feel responsible in a way, they think they (society = parents, schools, people in general) failed, and failing is a no-no… which goes back to poor emotional management (and a need to be in control and perfect). Yes, it’s so much to talk about…

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  15. Amazing topic for you to bring up, Sarah, and I’m glad you did. I was as unsuspecting as you when I first saw it on Netflix. I knew it was based off of a book, but not much else. I’m the sort that likes to give all movies/series from books a try at least once just for the sake of seeing the setting, so I can figure out if the book itself is worth a read or notβ€”and wow. I knew there would be a lot of teenage drama involved from the trailer and that she commits suicide, but I agree with you when you say that Netflix really should’ve included more warnings because the direction in which the story turned, pinning guilt and embellishing how β€œimportant” she became after her death isn’t something I think they should so easily show people that do have suicidal thoughts at present. Especially teenagers that may feel as though they’re invisible or want to somehow get back at someone. Teens are free to watch it whenever they please of course, but those extra little warnings may caution some away from it, and will really help in the long run when people are deciding what to watch.

    I’m looking forward to reading more of your discussions on this.

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    1. Yes, I couldn’t agree more. I thought, well, it’s a show, let’s watch and maybe I’ll get the book too. I did get the book, but I can’t bring myself to read it just yet. I can relate to how she felt and how she made a resolution with herself that no one would ever hurt her again, but that’s a topic for another post. Unfortunately that’s something many teenagers in similar situations have thought or felt.

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      1. My friend has the book, and he says it was easier to stomach than the series because that actually shows all the graphic details on screen to you, but I’d have to disagree. Because if you’re reading it, then your imagination gets the front seat and that could lead to a whole new, more terrifying place. But at least you know what kind of ride you’re in for this time, so you can fully prepare yourself. And oh, I can’t wait for that topic. I’ve already got some things whirring in my head about how she handled her resolution that I’d like to say and relate to your own thoughts on the matter.

        Haha, this feels a lot like a book club forum type thing! It’s a lot of fun. πŸ™‚ Even if the series we’re discussing is dark.

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      2. Yeah, in a way, the book can guide you in a certain direction, and you can contemplate what isn’t shown in detail in a book, but you can also choose to not go deeper. This show puts it out there. It doesn’t shy away from the hard parts, and while it is controversial and definitely triggering, it was important to show them in the way they did. Which, is another discussion. 🀣🀣 I’m glad to hear you’re on board for this.

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      3. Oh! That’s a really good point — being able not to choose to go deeper, I mean. I didn’t consider that when thinking about which would be easier or worse.. Hmm.. you’ve given me something to think about for the day. I’ll have to reconsider which one’s really easier to sit through.

        And I’m glad to be here. πŸ™‚

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  16. I agree that there should have been more disclaimers for the series as a whole. If you’re going to write or create any sort of art that deals with suicide or abuse, people should be warned. I was also really disappointed that they didn’t provide more resources. Depression/anxiety/PTSD can be a very isolating experience, particularly when you’re a teenager. I can’t imagine watching the show 10 years ago and not having anywhere to turn – it wouldn’t have gone well for me then. Even watching the show as an adult was upsetting in that sense.

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  17. I really enjoyed reading your perspective on providing warnings/disclaimers on the show. It is enlightening and I appreciate the sensitivity that you have about triggering emotions in both your readers and the show’s viewers.
    I think it is difficult to set the standard for what requires a warning in the television/movie and book industry to the level that you speak. Language, nudity, violence that’s one thing, but to determine what might be a trigger for certain people could provide extensive results. But I certainly think it is worth the time to consider and discuss it.
    Also, after reading the initial comments that have already come in and anticipating future comments, I have to extend some sort of thank you or apology or something for subjecting yourself to what already appears to be a heated conversation. I think your discussion on this show/topic is valuable, so thank you for being brave enough to take it on and for taking some heat for even bringing it up.

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    1. I wasn’t trying to do this for the debate, but I agree. There are many various triggers, but if there’s an overarching theme surrounding abuse or degradation of any kind, there probably needs to be a warning. It’s meant to say that potentially depressing or emotional issues will be present. My purpose is to shed light on what I’ve observed and explain why I believe something was right or wrong. Not everyone is going to be receptive of this, and I knew that going in. I think it’s important to share my thoughts and at least for right now, I plan to continue doing that.

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  18. Why not add a trigger warning to everything on TV.
    Trigger warning: this show contains a dog. It may trigger those who have been bit by a dog.
    Trigger warning: this show contains a ham sandwich. It may trigger those who have choked on a ham sandwich.

    The general description of a show should be enough. If your PTSD is that deep you probably wouldn’t have started this show to begin with.

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    1. A trigger warning is meant to help people decide if they want to continue on. A ham sandwich and a dog have no comparison to rape, abuse, or other intensely emotionally damaging content. As I said in the post, I knew nothing about the book or the show, other than what the trailer offers. And that included very little about what actually happens, other than a girl killed herself. Yes, we knew that was an overarching theme of the show, so it could have been excessive, but there were certain episodes that were more intense than others. The point is, I didn’t know what else waited for me when I started watching. I didn’t even know I needed to look it up first. As I said at the conclusion of the post, I think there’s enough buzz going around about the show right know that most people are aware of its content, but early on, unless you already knew about the story, people were going in blind.

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  19. Thank you for this post, but I am so sick of this book. What a terrible thing to do, shove your emotional burdens on someone else. It glamorizes a celebrity sort of life after death, and that’s a message kids don’t need either.

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    1. I understand that there’s controversy over the book and the show. I’m speaking specifically about the show. In time, I’m going to cover all these issues and why I think they they made these decisions. And I think if we are talking to our kids about it the right way, in addition with all the signs that indicate Hannah made the wrong choice, maybe kids will see this isn’t the answer.

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  20. I can definitely understand the need for more warnings. I think that because the book has been out for 10 years and in the description it states that Hannah dies from suicide, I think they thought more people would know before watching it you know? Also, this is only the second show that I know to ever include content warning on specific episodes so it’s a least a step forward. They’ll probably know better for the next season now. Looking forward to the rest of your reviews on it!

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    1. Yes, true. But especially as people start to understand the characters more (through flashbacks when Hannah was alive and after her death) the pain of before is different than the pain after, and the issues that may lead people to think it might be a good idea is why those warnings should be there.

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      1. True. I honestly didn’t know what awaited. Of course, from the trailer I knew she died, but everything else? It seemed like maybe there was a murder or something unlike this. I thought if it was a mystery, maybe she wasn’t dead, but trying to protect herself. I quickly saw that wasn’t the case. But I do see your point.

        Liked by 1 person

  21. I felt exactly the same thing as you when I watched the show… They should have added some warning… They must also have suggested a way out of Suicide but not trigger it..

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I think removing the suicide would have taken a large part of the story away. Suicide is the second largest killer of teens these days, and that needs to stop. Having that warning and a resource for help is anyone needs it for any reason would be a helpful step to preventing someone from going deeper into a dark place.

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  22. My writings posted or private contain a lot of antisocial or self destructive thoughts. Reading the first parts of your post and having no idea about the show you are talking about just reminded me that i should write a disclaimer or warning about those aspects. I always think if ever my darkness would push someone to kill themselves. Since i find great confort in being a reader or watcher of such category. It makes me wonder if i might take it all in one day and act on it. Anyways the point is your post is enlightening and a disclaimer is a must, making people know that we dont encourage acting on negativity but rather seeking professional help. Your posts are always lovely to read. Much love

    Liked by 1 person

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