Poetry

Firing Squad

“Before you
jump the gun
and pull
that trigger,
know you
aren’t alone.”

Suicide is such a taboo topic. Not many people realize what is really happening. In the aftermath, there’s so much pain and loss. Some people are blindsided and end up losing their friend, sibling, child, or parent. But to the one that’s sick — the one that feels like death is their only answer — they believe the world, including their loved ones, will be better off. Relieved, even. Their world-view is so skewed that nothing is logical any longer. Take a moment and let people know how you feel about them. It really could save their life. Or, if you’re on the other side of the equation, don’t be so quick to assume suicide is your best, and only option.

Β© Sarah Doughty

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46 thoughts on “Firing Squad”

  1. thanks, Sarah, for bringing this up. i hear people say suicide is selfish. even the bible considers it wicked and foolish, “be not over much wicked, neither be you foolish: why should you die before your time?” (ecclesiastes 7:17). i see and appreciate the argument in these perspectives, but i believe every suicide should be judged, if you really have to judge, on the prevailing circumstances.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. It’s a hard thing to understand. Today I gave a powerful poem by Anne Sexton, who committed suicide in 1974, on my blog. The poem approaches the topic of depression and death. She used poetry as therapy, but it didn’t work out in the end…

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Although it’s hard to support someone who’s considering suicide. To them, your words of praise or love or whatever sound so plastic and fake. Once they’ve got it in their heads that life is no good, changing their mind……Phew! To them, nothing is real except the idea–the fact–that things are bad and they’re only going to get worse. They envision this shoal of evil beings who control fate, the universe, and they see that shoal as out to get them. The THEY concept. THEM. THEY are terrible. THEY have it in for me. I’m doomed. That sort of thing. For many of these people, done is done. But I wish you well in convincing them otherwise.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It’s better to try than to do nothing. By doing nothing, it feeds into that mentality that no one cares. But maybe there’ll be a glimmer of hope or doubt that will make someone try another day.

      Like

  4. So true. There is so much stigma surrounding suicide. So many untimely deaths could be prevented if those people receive help, support and understanding at the right time. Thanks for sharing. The world needs to hear this.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Thanks for sharing this..i think this is somethingparents should be very vigilant of…some kids even adults may seem to be very happy but we actually dont know what’s really goin on in thier minds…its normally the parents who have the responsibility of raising kids who are able to see through clearly about issues in life..because we actually never know what they would become or would be capable of doing ib the futturee
    .

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I understand. Young children (like under 10) shouldn’t be able to understand what suicide even is but I was shocked the other day when my mother told me something my niece said. She’s six months older than my son and that scared me. They know the concept of death, but suicide? What could be teaching them these things at such a young age?

      Liked by 1 person

  6. This is really important. I had a childhood friend commit suicide over twenty years ago now, and I was one of the last people he spoke to. Your post has brought it right back to the present for me. Thanks for writing this. It’s really important.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Great post, I come from an African country where depression isn’t even consider a problem but simply just having a bad day. A medical doctor recently committed suicide by jumping off a bridge recently in my country and left behind a wife and two children. No one understood why until it was discovered that he had been depressed and demoralized by the horrors he had witnessed over the years of his profession. Once again great and enlightening post. This is a serious issue that I hope gets taken with more gravity and care

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you. I remember when I was younger, I had thoughts (of which I knew I’d never actually do) of doing some very strange things to tell the bullies and all the people that hurt me that they caused me death. (I realize this sounds a little like 13 Reasons Why, but I’ve yet to read or watch it). Needless to say, I thought the people that cared, didn’t care enough, and the ones that abused and bullied me would consider it a victory if I ever did and my life. So not only would I never do it because I don’t feel that way, but even if I did, I wouldn’t because it would let them win. I’m too stubborn to let that happen. πŸ’•

      Liked by 2 people

  8. So true. I couldn’t understand why my sister did it until I learned more about how she was afflicted with bipolar and ptsd. I understand better now and know she sought relief from something and it was the only choice. I have forgiven her and support intervention warriors here and elsewhere

    Liked by 1 person

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